My New Blogging Home!

My New Blogging Home!

Hey all! Femme Rewritten here.

I’m moving my blog to a new home and under a new name!

This new website will be home to my new blog “As She Writes It”,  my poetry, creative projects, and more!

I’d love if you’d follow me there, and subscribe to my new blog!

I’ve loved my time here at wordpress, and appreciate all the love you’ve given me over the past 3 years. It’s been a great experience, and I’m excited to make more over at As She Writes It!

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Moving to a new Home!

Moving to a new Home!

Hey all! Femme Rewritten here.

I’m moving my blog to a new home and under a new name!

This new website will be home to my new blog “As She Writes It”,  my poetry, creative projects, and more!

I’d love if you’d follow me there, and subscribe to my new blog!

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FENTY BEAUTY – Thoughts & Review

FENTY BEAUTY – Thoughts & Review

Hi guys! I’m back from a little hiatus. I was able to continue school, but it’s definitely keeping me busy. When I’m not in class, I’m working, or fulfilling my duties as a member in various university organizations. Don’t get me wrong, I love being busy though!

With everything going on, it was nice to be able to get my hands on some Fenty Beauty, and enjoy some retail therapy, as I can’t engage in that as frequently as I used to.

So as everyone knows Rihanna dropped Fenty Beauty on Friday, September 8th, and snatched edges while doing so. As a public figure, known fashionista, and of course a divergent musical artist, we should have expected her makeup line to be so groundbreaking; but still no one was prepared.

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She launched her brand in over 17 countries all on the same day, releasing 40 foundation shades, 6 powder highlighters, 1 lip color, brushes & tools, and these beautiful innovative  products that she calls Match Stix.

Since I’m not the biggest makeup person, I only picked up the GlossBomb Universal Lip Luminizer, one of the Match Stick Matte Skinstick Concealers, a Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter, and 2 of her portable brushes.

Before we even get down to the shades and the quality of the product I received, the beauty of her packaging definitely sold me (especially since I got everything online). Each item has a sleek design, with either an iridescent white, or a frost glass finish. Until you have it in your hands, you can’t truly appreciate it for what it is.

Okay so let’s break down what I got!

Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter

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So I’m going to start off with my favorite product of hers, the Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter. This comes in 6 beautiful powder shades, and they’re creamy blendable, and highly pigmented. They have a crisp shimmer finish, and are definitely worth the price.

I purchased the shade Mean Money/Hu$tla Baby duo, which is a soft champagne and peachy gold combo. I absolutely adore the names! 4 of the Killawatt Freestyle Highlighters are duos with two complimentary shades. One operates as a more natural glimmer, and the other is a blinding and powerful shine. The other 2 are single shades, that are entirely equal in beauty. Trophy Wife, Metal Moon, Lightning Dust/Fire Crystal, Mean Money/Hu$tla Baby, Girl Next Door/Chic Phreak, and Ginger Binge/Moscow Mule.

At first application, I used her portable highlighter brush, and it glided on like a cream highlighter. It was very easy to blend, and just a PSA: a little goes a long ass way! This highlighter will literally last me a year or more.

I first off went for Mean Money/Hu$tla Baby because I’m always immediately attracted to soft gold tones. Since I have more yellow undertones, I feel that gold really complements my skin. After trying it on firstly at home, and then wearing it the next day and receiving a billion compliments, I knew this was an impeccable shade for me.

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Even at this, I’m still excited to try out Trophy Wife and Ginger Binge/Moscow Mule in the future.

This highlighter was priced at $34, which for a quality high-end highlighter, is a perfectly reasonable value.

Match Stix Matte Skinstick

This product is a hit. Her Match Stix Matte Skinsticks are longwear, lightweight, matte, and come in 20 shades differing from light to dark, warm to cool.

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I purchased the shade Suede, since I didn’t want anything too drastic, but more subtle. Because I’m not one for a lot of makeup, I use concealer instead of foundation (but I’m tempted because her foundations look amazing). I simply put it under my eyes, and on any dark spots, and then blend it in with a finishing powder. This is one product that I will say does not need a finish. It dries amazingly quick, and seemingly sets itself!

I haven’t worn it all day yet (as I’m more of a bare-faced everyday kinda girl) but I have all confidence that it’ll last a night out.

The Match Stix Matte Skinsticks are priced at $25, and also come in Cream Highlighters, and Contours! (I’m looking forward to trying the Match Stix Shimmer Skinstick in Rum!)

Portable Contour/Concealer & Highlighter Brushes

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I haven’t bought new brushes since maybe 2 years ago (please don’t roast me), so I decided to purchase two brushes of hers that I know I would really use. Aside from an eyeshadow brush (which she doesn’t have, yet), I love a bomb highlighter brush, and a good concealer brush as well.

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These completely surpassed my expectations. The brushes are uber soft, and very gentle. The highlighter brush is a slanted angled medium-density beauty, that works amazingly well with her powder highlighters (and I’m sure they’ll work beautifully with her Shimmer Skinsticks as well). The concealer brush is rounded and soft, dense enough to gently and effectively blend out her cream Matte Skinsticks.

Each portable brush is $24. For someone who hasn’t bought brushes in a minute, I was fine with the price.

Gloss Bomb Universal Lip Luminizer

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Last but, certainly, not least, I ordered her Gloss Bomb Universal Lip Luminizer; her sole lip color. This was extremely daring, which just one of the things I love about Rihanna. She marketed this lip gloss as a universal “gotta-have-it” rose nude lip for all skin tones, with explosive shine. Her “stop-everything, give-it-to-me gloss”, feels as luscious as it looks, and is packed with moisturizing Shea, finished wth a decadent peachy-vanilla scent.

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I was so excited to try this, as everyone that knows me, KNOWS I’m a gloss girl. I love me some lipgloss. But then, I’m also someone who prefers nude tones over color, and I love a good nude or clear shine lip. This was it for me. It has the perfect amount (so a lot) of shine, rose nude tone, and isn’t sticky–like at all. It slides on, and moisturizes your lips throughout the day, thanks to the Shea she ever-so-gracefully slipped in there. Gotta love your Black girls.

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Her Universal Lip Luminizer was price at a beautiful $16.

I literally cried, this price was so perfect.


All in all, my edges were most definitely snatched. Her brand, her drop, her visuals… Everything literally took my breath away. I waited online behind 11,000 people to get my hands on Fenty Beauty, and I’m so glad I did.

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I was elated to finally see so many products for all my black and brown girls out there, and completely appreciated the amount of shades she had in–well, everything. In her first exclusive makeup line, she did more in one day than most makeup companies have attempted to do in years.

So far, I give everything I purchased a 15/10! I’m completely looking forward to trying out more of her lovely products, and CAN’T WAIT for her Holiday Collection drop this month. I’m really looking forward to seeing what she has in store for the makeup community (and my edges) in the future.

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RiRi’s done it, yet again.

Make sure you follow my social media!

  • Instagram: @menaenu
  • Twitter: @menaszn
  • Snapchat: @offlinemena
  • Facebook: @menaenu

Sending my love, and signing off for now,

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Femme Rewritten & 500 WordPress Followers

Femme Rewritten & 500 WordPress Followers

Hi all! I’m writing to you guys today about something that I am very proud to share.

I’ve been thinking about this for quite some time, and two days ago, I finally took the steps to officially change my blog’s name from Noire Rewritten to Femme Rewritten. I had get new domains, make new banners and visuals, change the blog around a bit, and make all new business cards. Despite all of this (it was a ton to accomplish in two days), I have to say that I am highly inspired about this transition and the growth of my blog’s brand.

Just for the sake of a little background, in French, Noire translates to “Black” or “Dark”. As an African American woman, I’ve always wanted to question and confront the chauvinistic and destructive theorem that has been ascribed to the Black narrative. Ergo the “Rewritten” half of my blog’s name. I wanted a name that was exclusive and yet inclusive, but still something that easily got my principle message across–Noire Rewritten did just that.

As my first year with this blog came to a close, I began to write about more than issues in just Black and Brown communities. I built up to writing about the false generalizations and toxic expectations for woman in historical and modern day society, and how to go about changing those restrictive normalizations day by day. Somewhere along those blurred lines, I began to write about fashion, beauty, self love, and self care.

While wholeheartedly accepting that the struggle of a Black Woman will always be the most arduous of every race, in this moment, I realize that my expansions on what it means to be a Black Woman, can partially transcend to what it means to be a woman altogether.

As my writing develops and the idea behind my blog deepens, I’ve found that I want to adopt a brand that embodies my entire vision for what I’ve always wanted my blog to be. I feel that now, Femme Rewritten not only encompasses me, a young Nigerian American woman, but also embraces all of the aspects that make me, and other women of color, women. 

This blog can now allow itself to be a more comprehensive environment, and yet still distinctive enough to focus on matters of Black, Brown, and Female communities that don’t receive enough positive scrutiny. Through all of this, know that this blog still remains a Pro-Black, Black Lives Matter, and Liberal space–I’ve now just officially declared it a Feminist one, if it wasn’t already apparent before.

With this new brand, I aspire to assist in rewriting what our bureaucracy stigmatizes all women of color to be.

I also want to utilize this post to thank you all for 500 WORDPRESS FOLLOWERS! It was only June 3rd that I was thanking you for 100. I can’t even begin to express how thrilled I am to be reaching more hearts, and more minds.

P.S: yesterday I was nominated for the Mystery Blogger Award, so I’ll be making a post about that, which will include my own nominees as well!

Thank you, stay tuned, and as usual, comment below what you’d like to see me post about next (or if you just want to say hi)!

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Until my next post, I leave you with this question:

What will you rewrite?

Sending my love,

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Thank You!

Thank You!

Thanks so much for 100 followers! Just days ago I was just a little over 40!

You guys have no idea how much this means to me. I started this blog a year ago, and fell off for quite some time, only to come back this summer after my mother passed away. Her passing is taking everything from me, and I think the only thing keeping me together, keeping me here, are the people I love, and the ability to channel what little feeling I have left through my writing.

Although I may not personally know many of you, I am exceptionally pleased to have you guys here, reading my work; it’s a deeply appreciated form of unspoken support.

If you have any content suggestions, any feedback… anything, let me know down below!

Stay tuned for more posts, and again, thank you.

Sending my love,

Mena

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Dear Uninformed

Dear Uninformed

Recently, I made a post on my college course’s discussion board concerning Martin Luther King Jr’s Letter From Birmingham Jail, race relations, and natural law. I brought up how since the Civil Rights Movement, though we, as a country, have made progress, that progress seems to have slowed–to have plateaued since the 70’s. With every step the black community and other communities of color make, it’s like America attempts to take ten steps back. From racial profiling in Arizona due to their SB1070 law on immigration to police brutality in our neighborhoods; from color on color crime to glass ceilings people of color constantly face, it’s like the progress we’ve made, levels out with regression the country has made.

My classmate, whose name will remain undisclosed, happens to be a 40 year old Caucasian women with three kids. She responded to me in a way I found ignorant and borderline insulting.

Have a look below:

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Now, I, of course, do not want to perpetuate the “angry black women” stereotype, but for discussion’s sake, let’s just say I’m a bit miffed.

I may or may not have overreacted, which was why I didn’t send it to her. It is an online university classroom setting, and while she did not care to keep it sensible, I prefer to keep it professional. Let’s count this as a letter that was never sent. I’ll let you guys take a look though.

My response below:

I have read your response and taken a couple days to really figure out how I’d like to respond to you.

For you to take it upon yourself to assume or even ask me if I have had any “personal experience” that I can relate to racism in my life, is a little insulting. As a young African-American women, I have had countless experiences with prejudice, but none of them disappointed me more than your statement. This is an Ethics class and for you to insinuate that I am pulling the race card means that you really must not understand the purpose of this class. The purpose of this class is to discuss ethics, moral principles, virtues and to pull the race card when necessary. The discussion was under MLK, Race, and Natural Law, so in this regard, we also have the right to talk about oppressors, the oppressed, and oppression. We have the right to question the lack of ethics behind exploitation of countless races, the tragedy many of them have endured and how it has changed or remained the same today, and you’re saying that we should not pull the race card?

You say that you disagree that colorblindness is meant to increase white privilege. Well coming from an opposite perspective, from someone who does not have the fruitful benefits of white privilege, or the luxury of being “colorblind”, I am here to tell you that it does. You asked why there has to be an emphasis on color… The topic centered around MLK, race, and today’s society. That’s quite a loaded topic of discussion, and there was really no way for me to spare sensitive or stubborn feelings. The instructor asked me to give my opinion, and as I was allowed to do, I gave it while pulling the race card. 

You see, when you look at a person, you have the luxury of not seeing color. That, my dear white counterpart, is the privilege of being colorblind. But when I look at myself in the mirror, I am constantly reminded of the limitations that I had no choice in accepting. I am constantly reminded that the system is built for me to fail, and because of that, I choose to succeed. You see, I’m quite a stubborn girl.

The fact that you cannot see that progress for equality has greatly slowed since the 70’s is proof that you are in fact “colorblind”. “We have an African American President!”, yes but we also have 102 unarmed African Americans who were killed in 2015 alone, by the police force. This topic falls under the same category as Martin Luther King’s letter from the Birmingham Prison does, meaning that I had every right to pull in anecdotal evidence. With every step the black community and other communities of color seem to take, America seems to want to take about 10 steps back. This is why our progress with race relations has plateaued as a country. You simply have to pay attention.

Please do not speak for Martin Luther Kind Jr. (may he rest in peace) and call black people racist in the same breath. That would be an insult to everything he diligently worked for.

You think that it is racist for the black community to be gracious and creative enough to create black owned and populated programs? May I ask you why? Because the programs you may be speaking of are black owned, but are in no way black restrictive. There are plenty of white and non-black people of color who receive exposure on black owned programs. Please, never insinuate that African Americans have ever attempted to segregate. Something unfairly imposed, and is still being imposed, on us to this day. When I watched the Oscars some weeks ago, most of the people being represented were white males, and it’s been that way for quite sometime. When you watch most programs, who do you see? People of color barely have representation in the media as it is, unless it is negative, and when they create their own outlets for peaceful expression, you call that racism?

Let me tell you something. People of color, especially black people, can never be racist. I’m here to tell you, that “reverse racism” does not exist. Racism is a problem of institutionalization, where one group (in this case White Americans) has the power to take its prejudices and exercise them with impunity under the de facto color of law. I am troubled when I hear people assert that all White people are racist, because that is far from the truth. But I am even more disgusted when Black people are called racist because of their response to racism.

You see, all white people consciously and unconsciously benefit in minuscule and gargantuan ways from the prejudice in general society. Those benefits include, but are not at all limited to, not experiencing “driving while black”, “shopping while black”, “being educated while black”, “walking while black”, “angry on your front porch while black” kind of attention on a regular basis in their lives.

As Sobantu Mzwakali once said, “A man cannot hate the whip with which he is being flogged but then be expected to love the person doing the flogging. When such a black man, lying helpless bleeding on the ground expresses hate for the white person wielding the whip, it is only reasonable”.

The oppressed can never be racist, because racism was created by viscous oppressors who harnessed their institutionalized power and imposed prejudices and idealities on the people they considered to be beneath them.

African Americans and people of color do not have the standardized power, established over centuries, to enforce their bias on the majority culture.

Because of this, it is impossible for black people to be “racist”, and because of this, Black pain will never require validation from the white man to be considered real. Black people can be heavily prejudiced, but they can never be racist. That, my dear classmate, is one of the limitations I enjoy having.

I think we should focus on improving education, working towards a common goal, improving race relations, and calling out people like you who think it is okay to make statements such as the ones you did. The next time you, as a white person, would like to accuse the Black community of “reverse racism” and unjustifiable anger, I highly suggest you remind yourself what class you are taking, and that you check yourself, and your privilege.

Now, I thank you for listening to my viewpoints.

~

Too much? Yeah, I think so too, but sometimes people like that need a rude awakening. As I stated before, I did not post this on the discussion board, as I like to keep school strictly professional. I am, though, debating on emailing this to her. I truly believe she did not realize the significance of what she was saying; you cannot mention the amazing work Martin Luther King did for the black community, and in the same breath call the black community racist for creating methods of expressing themselves. Blacks cannot be racist, and I, for one, am happy to have that limitation.

Leave your comments and how you would have responded to her below! School me too, because everyone has something to learn.

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The Beauty of Melanin

The Beauty of Melanin

mel·a·nin

ˈmelənən/
noun
  1. a dark brown to black pigment occurring in the hair, skin, and iris of the eye in people and animals. It is responsible for tanning of skin exposed to sunlight.

“I have brown skin, brown hair, brown eyes. This is because of Melanin”.

“If it ranges between brown and black; it has Melanin”.

“Usually people with Melanin have better eye sight, natural muscle physique, and better, youthful and beautifully elastic skin”.

 

Melanin. From the definition and provided anecdotes, it seems as if the concept of melanin is pure essence, pure beauty – it seems as if melanin is a positive attribute. But anyone who didn’t naturally understand the beauty of melanin and its divine purpose, would be fooled by the way sociocultural standards of beauty paint it today. Anyone who has been affected by calumnious societies who appreciate aspects of white ideology and white privilege would never have known that melanin is the true source of all things beautiful. Melanin is the reason there is color, it is the basis of every hue and the essence of all things beautiful and young.

Maybe it was once understood. Maybe it was appreciated in a world long before white ideology stripped blackness of its royalty. Maybe just maybe, melanin was desirable.

 

Modern Humans Derived From Africa

Many believe that melanin is an adaptation, but they are so far from the truth, not even Christopher Columbus could venture their waters. Let this be known: the lack of melanin is an adaptation, not the other way around.

We are solely children of Africa—with no Neandertals or island-dwelling “hobbits” in our family tree, according to a new study. Scientists who compared the skulls and DNA of human remains from around the world say their results point to modern humans (Homo sapiens) having a single origin in Africa.”

New data supports the theory that the single origin for anatomically modern humans is from Africa. Early humans colonized the planet after spreading across the world about 50,000 years ago.  National Geographic places the original roots of modern humanity in south-central Africa. The archaic remains found farther away from Africa, represent the adaptation to climate, land, and lifestyle. In short: white skin is an adaptation of the european environment. 

 

Benefits of Melanin

Melanin Is Essential to Brain, Nerve, and Organ Function.

In humans, melanin is the determining factor of hair and skin color. Inconsequently, few people realize that melanin is found in almost every organ of the body and is necessary for the brain and nerves to operate properly.

Translation: melanin is a necessity for survival.

Melanin Protects Black Skin

Melanin targets the biggest cause of widespread damage to human cells: free radicals. Free radicals are responsible for any type of skin damage, from discoloration, wrinkles, sagging, and more importantly, to skin cancer. Melanin is the reason why African-Americans are at the all time lowest risk for developing skin cancer. Our skin was made to absorb the properties of the sun, not reflect them.

Exposure to the sun primarily causes premature aging, as well as skin cancer and one’s ability to withstand the damaging affects of the sun’s ultraviolet radiation depends on the levels of melanin in your skin. Melanin, a natural absorber of light, dissipates more than 99.9% of UV radiation. Even the lightest skinned black people have more protection from the sun than the darkest Caucasians. Though there is a limit to the amount of protection melanin provides (yes, you still have to wear sunscreen, this protection is significantly higher in naturally dark skin. As a result of this, darkly pigmented people tend to exhibit less signs of aging. Increased melanin protects its owners from short-term damage from the sun, as well as long-term signs of aging (i.e. age spots, deep wrinkles and rough texture, sagging, and discoloration).

Translation: black don't crack.

Melanin Aids in Human Reproduction

Dark pigmentation protects precious DNA from damage and absorbs the necessary amount of UV radiation needed to keep the body healthy. Melanin also protects against folate depletion, which women need to maintain healthy eggs, proper transferring of eggs, and the normal development of the baby after fertilization. Dark-skinned women suffer the lowest level of baby defects.

Translation: we good.

Melanin vs Melatonin

Melanin and Melatonin are two chemically related substances, but harbor many different characteristics. Again, Melanin is the major human pigment found in black skin, eyes, and hair. Melatonin is responsible for maintaining sleep cycles, biological rhythms and the regulation of melanin synthesis.

Translation: beauty sleep aids in the glowing of beautiful black skin.

 

The Power of Melanin

Melanin is black because its chemical structure allows no energy to escape, making black melanin the sole absorber of energy and light.

Translation: our darkness harbors the brightest light.

According to many authors, skin melanin is a result of UV rays, which despite popular belief, do not have to come from overused tanning beds. Melanin possess the unique ability to absorb energy and convert said energy into a re-usable source.

Melanin can rearrange its chemical structure to absorb all energy across the radiant spectrum. This includes sun-rays, light-rays, music vibrations, sound waves, and sun heat. This could be another major reason why Africans connect on such a deep level with music, and why most of our music was manifested. As a race that is used to being in the sun, whether on our rightful continent, or wrongfully enslaved on another’s, music is a natural response to happiness, adversity, and any other feeling black people may possess.

We could not physically exist without our melanin; our organs, our motor functions, our senses, and our minds could not work without the presence of it. The five physical senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch) are our sensory reactions to the outside world in response to melanin.

Melanin exists on a dark plane of matter, a cosmic biological gateway in which the life form of the spiritual mind can manifest and exist in the material realm.

Melanin, is our power – our essence – while the sun is our source.

We are solar beings.

“We Afrikans, with our distinct racial features -blackness, curly hair, broad nose, thick lips, etc.- are really blessed with greatest gift from nature. The source of all this beauty is this precious life and chemical substance; Melanin.”

The prominent presence of Melanin in African-American people is a testament to the fact that we are the prime examples of elegance and beauty.

We are the ideology.

Despite centuries upon centuries of slavery, objectification, hatred, and prejudice, no one can tell us that black is not beautiful – Black is beauty.

“Dipped in chocolate, bronzed in elegance, enameled with grace, toasted with beauty. My lord, she’s a black woman.”

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